Unique 1954 Monk Special heads to market

Unique 1954 Monk Special heads to market

A unique car with a fantastic history is to go under the hammer when WB & Sons holds its next classic auction on February 12. Known as the Monk Special, the oneoff trials car was built in 1953 by father and son duo Cyril and James Monk at their home in Slough.


Following the war, the DIY construction of trials cars began to proliferate, often based on the Austin Seven. However, Cyril and James built their creation with a Morris Minor chassis and an engine from a Ford 8, with shakedown runs performed in their back garden.

Fitted with a home-brew body comprising a wood frame and aluminium panels, the car also received a fold away roof designed and made by Cyril’s wife, who insisted the car have a roof. After the car was complete, the Monks had to remove the rear wall of the garage to get the car out of the garden.

Where most specials were simply registered as an Austin Special (or whatever was appropriate to the base car), the Monk family registered the car with the DVLA as a Monk Special. Cyril had plans to sell his cars to other likeminded motorsport fans, but ultimately no more were produced.

Currently owned by the first owner outside of the Monk family and only the third in total, the car is sold with a book of original photos taken throughout the build process, letters and drawings from a designer for the logo, original newspaper interviews and adverts, certificates from shows and Cyril’s handwritten cost sheet detailing all his expenditure. Bidders are invited to submit their best bid to secure the car – see www.wbandsons.com for more details.


A unique car with a fantastic history is to go under the hammer when WB & Sons holds its next classic auction on February 12. Known as the Monk Special, the oneoff trials car was built in 1953 by father and son duo Cyril and James Monk at their home in Slough.

This unique Monk Special is to be auctioned by WB & Sons.

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