Lamborghini Huracán Buyers’ Guide

Lamborghini Huracán Buyers’ Guide

After eight years on sale, the Huracán remains Lamborghini’s most focused driver’s car ever. With plenty of examples to choose from, is this the perfect used Lambo? Or are there hidden traps awaiting?


Words by Tim Pitt

Images by Michael Ward

LAMBORGHINI HURACÁN: USED BUYING SECRETS REVEALED

Is Lamborghini’s most popular car a great buy?


Lamborghini built, on average, about 200 cars a year during its first four decades – including fewer than 2000 examples of the Countach and 800 Miuras. So, when you learn that the Sant’Agata factory recently assembled its 20,000th Huracán, you might question how special this ‘junior’ Lamborghini really is. Rest assured, it’s very much the real deal.


Lamborghini Huracán

It starts with that shape: an arrowhead with angles so sharp they could draw blood. Then there’s the naturally aspirated 5.2-litre V10, one of the most outrageous engines ever to pass an MOT. Factor in 200mph performance, track-honed handling and an 8500rpm scream to wake the dead, and there’s no doubt the Huracán is supercar heaven.

Lamborghini revealed the original Huracán LP610-4 at the Geneva Motor Show in 2014, as the replacement for the Gallardo. As per its name, it has a Longitudinale Posteriore (longitudinal rear) engine that develops 610hp – at least 40hp more than its predecessor – and sends drive to all four wheels. A 0-62mph time of 3.2 seconds and 202mph top speed allow it to lock horns with the Ferrari 458 Italia and McLaren 650S.

The convertible LP610-4 Spyder debuted a year later, 120kg heavier but scarcely any slower, with an electrically operated roof that disappears beneath the humped rear deck in 17 seconds. Available in black, brown or red, the sleek fabric top also features a retractable glass rear window – so owners can enjoy the V10 fireworks even when the weather turns a bit ‘British’. To date, 29 per cent of Huracán buyers have opted for the Spyder.

In 2016, Lamborghini turned convention on its head by introducing a supercar with less power than its predecessor. The Huracán LP580-2 sacrificed 30hp and needed an extra 0.2sec to reach 62mph, but with 33kg less weight and only two driven wheels, it was a more exciting prospect for keen drivers. However, a true rival for the forthcoming Ferrari 488 Pista was waiting in the wings: the 2017 LP640-4 Performante, a hardcore Huracán that smashed the Nürburgring lap record with a time of 6min 52sec – beating the Porsche 918 Spyder (an 875hp, £704,000 hypercar) by a full five seconds. Besides more power, a 40kg diet, 10 per cent stiffer suspension and sticky Pirelli P Zero Corsa tyres, its secret weapon was Aerodinamica Lamborghini Attiva (ALA): an F1-style aero system with active front flaps and rear spoilers to boost downforce or reduce drag. A Performante Spyder duly followed, before the facelifted Huracán Evo arrived in 2019. This borrowed the uprated 640hp Performante engine (good for 0-62mph in 2.9sec) and introduced a new rear-wheel steering system and four-wheel torque vectoring for added agility. Inside, it gained an 8.4-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay connectivity (plus Android Auto and Alexa from March 2021) and a plethora of new options for personalisation. Nearly two thirds of Evo customers now use this Ad Personam scheme.

The Evo RWD of 2020 adopted the same template as the LP580-2, losing a pair of front driveshafts, along with an identical 30hp and 33kg. It was a useful £34,000 cheaper, too. The result was the most critically lauded Huracán since the Performante – at least until the STO came howling into view. This track-focused special combines the full-fat 640hp with rear-wheel drive, lashings of carbonfibre (saving 43kg) and aggressive aero, including a Miura-style front clamshell and three-position rear wing. Subtle it ain’t. Around 1500 Huracáns have been sold in the UK to date, but the story isn’t over yet. A new mid-range Tecnica model is due soon, featuring the STO drivetrain in a softer, more road-friendly package. A high-riding, Safari-style Huracán based on the 2019 Sterrato concept has also been spotted testing, and could arrive later this year. For off-road adventure, we’d pick that over a Lamborghini Urus every time.


ON THE ROAD

The Huracán has aged like a fine bottle of chianti. Far from slipping behind the pace, it has been steadily honed and enhanced since 2014. The appeal of a free-breathing V10 seems heightened in this modern era of turbocharging and electrification, too. Don’t forget, the Aventador’s replacement will be a plug-in hybrid. When the Huracán LP610-4 was launched, some criticised its optional Lamborghini Dynamic Steering (LDS) set-up, which feels very direct at low speeds, then offers a calmer response as you go faster, to the benefit of stability. It’s a definite case of ‘try before you buy’. However you spec it, an original Huracán isn’t as balletic as a 458 Italia, but many will appreciate its less spiky handling and four-wheel drive traction. After all, we don’t all possess the skills of legendary Lamborghini test driver, Valentino Balboni. The Huracán Spyder doesn’t feel notably compromised as a driving experience – its aluminium and carbonfibre structure is 40 per cent stiffer than the drop-top Gallardo – and retracting the roof only amplifies the aural overload coming from inches behind your ears. Just be prepared to pack light: there's the same 150-litre ‘frunk’, but even less usable space behind the seats than in the coupe.

If your budget stretches to a Performante, things really start to get exciting. Not only does it look sensational, with a fixed rear wing, ‘forged’ carbonfibre diffuser and Italian tricolore sill stripes, it also has the dynamic chops to rival the best from Maranello. The ALA system might be of limited use on the road, but the suspension tweaks deliver a newfound precision and malleability to the Huracán’s handling. It’s a five-star supercar, no question.

Buying nearly-new? The scalpel-sharp STO is the most thrilling supercar of the current crop – and arguably the best driver’s Lamborghini ever. A riotous blast through the Scottish Highlands in an STO (see our April 2022 issue) rates as one of our all-time most memorable drives. Unfortunately, the ultimate Huracán also has a waiting list that stretches into 2023, and used examples sell for well over list price.

Given those obstacles, our pick of the newer models is the brilliant Evo RWD. It does without the regular Evo’s rear steering, adaptive dampers, carbon-ceramic brakes and LDVI chassis control system, but the result, according to former Lamborghini CEO Stefano Domenicali, is “unfiltered feedback and an emotive and more engaging driving experience controlled by the pilot”. We don’t disagree.

One thing even this most back-to-basics Huracán can’t offer is a manual gearbox. Thankfully, the seven-speed dual-clutch transmission is one of the finest available: smooth and intuitive in Strada mode, then serving up brutal, thump-in-the-back upshifts when you switch to all-guns-blazing Corsa. You can also take control via the tactile metal paddles, wringing out the V10 to its limiter time and again.

Whichever Huracán you go for, the extravagant and overwhelming engine is its trump card. If a turbocharged V8 is like listening to heavy rock on headphones, this is the full live-at-Wembley experience. It’s the only remaining V10 in a production car – and almost certain to be the last of its kind. Yes, the Audi R8 V10 Plus is cheaper to buy and just as rabidly rapid, but do you really want to drive an Audi?


ENGINE/TRANSMISSION

Writing a buyers’ guide for the Huracán proved more challenging than expected because, well, not much goes wrong with them. The fact that most lead cosseted, low-mileage lives helps, of course, but Korel Hussein, used car manager for HR Owen Lamborghini, says: “The Huracán is a very reliable and sound car, with no particular mechanical or electrical issues.” Karl Verdi, owner and founder of Verdi Supercars, agrees: “If people don’t abuse them, nothing tends to break. We’ve only ever done one engine rebuild.”

Speaking of abuse, though, we all know some Lamborghini owners can be quite ‘exuberant’, and repeated maximum-attack starts can strip teeth from the cogs of the transmission. A combination of four-wheel drive, huge traction and 600hp puts serious strain on the dual-clutch ’box, so consider having the ECU interrogated by a specialist before you buy. They will be able to see how many times launch control has been deployed. Verdi quotes £12,000 to refurbish a gearbox – around half what you’d pay for a replacement ’box at a main dealer. HR Owen charges £3210 plus fitting for a new clutch. The only other issue is heat-soak from the tightly packaged engine, which can eventually lead to oil leaks. Again, this stems from a lack of mechanical sympathy. “Owners should let the car idle for a couple of minutes after hard use, rather than switching it off straight away,” advises Karl.


CHASSIS/BODY

Accident damage is the biggest worry for the Huracán’s aluminium-and-carbonfibre body. Any repair work must be faultless and fully documented if you want to protect the value of your investment. Korel says: “Opening up the bonnet, I would check for any signs of replacement parts. Look to see if screws have been removed from plastic covers in the engine bay.”

Corrosion isn’t an issue, but the check straps for the doors are a definite weak point. The weld comes away and can crack the surrounding aluminium skin beneath the A-pillar. “We’ve fixed five cars with the same problem now,” notes Karl.

Parking sensors and the rear-view camera are desirable extras, while Korel says the optional front lift-kit is an “absolute must” if you want to drive your Huracán over speed humps. Helpfully, most cars have it fitted, but its pneumatic dampers are known to leak, which can require a £3000 replacement. Elsewhere, the Huracán’s main dampers seem hard-wearing and its carbon-ceramic brake discs should last the lifetime of the car. Replacement steel discs cost £1471 per pair from HR Owen, with pads at £671 per axle. The low-slung front radiators are prone to damage from stone chips, although they aren’t especially expensive. “I always call both Audi and Lamborghini for parts prices to see who is cheaper,” Karl confides.


INTERIOR

The expression ‘try before you buy’ seems apt here; if you’re significantly over six feet tall, you may struggle to fit. Even in Spyder form, the windscreen header rail might well obstruct your vision. The fixed-back carbonfibre seats (most commonly seen in the Performante) are notoriously uncomfortable, too. Verdi has swapped several cars back to standard ‘Comfort’ seats. The dashboard is hardly a model of ergonomic clarity and the trim materials in early cars weren’t up to the high standards of its sister Audi R8. That said, faulty heater control modules are the only issue highlighted by Verdi, with a new unit costing around £1400.

If you’re handy with a spanner and fancy working on a Huracán yourself, park that damage from stone chips, although they aren’t especially expensive. “I always call both Audi and Lamborghini for parts prices to see who is cheaper,” Karl confides.


INTERIOR

The expression ‘try before you buy’ seems apt here; if you’re significantly over six feet tall, you may struggle to fit. Even in Spyder form, the windscreen header rail might well obstruct your vision. The fixed-back carbonfibre seats (most commonly seen in the Performante) are notoriously uncomfortable, too. Verdi has swapped several cars back to standard ‘Comfort’ seats. The dashboard is hardly a model of ergonomic clarity and the trim materials in early cars weren’t up to the high standards of its sister Audi R8. That said, faulty heater control modules are the only issue highlighted by Verdi, with a new unit costing around £1400.

If you’re handy with a spanner and fancy working on a Huracán yourself, park that idea right now. Even interior parts such as the airbags and seats are electronically coded to the chassis number – and only a Lamborghini dealer or a specialist with the right software will be able to make the parts ‘talk’ to each other.


RUNNING COSTS

The Huracán is a fully-paid-up supercar, and running costs reflect that, although it’s not quite in the V12 Aventador’s league. The servicing schedule is annual or every 9000 miles, whichever comes first, and it repeats every four years. Verdi charges £700, £1100, £1400 and £2200 respectively, while official Lamborghini dealer HR Owen asks between £1542 and £2853. For the Huracán Evo, a service pack was introduced for the duration of the four-year warranty, which can be extended up to seven-and-a-half years or 45,000 miles. This covers all the items listed on the service schedule.

PRICES

Despite the 20,000 Huracáns (and counting) built, values remain buoyant. You can forget buying a used Huracán for new Porsche 911 money: even the cheapest cars are well into six figures. The most affordable example we found was a 2014 LP610-4 with 25,000 miles on the clock, priced at £118,000. Compare that to around £45,000 for the leggiest Audi R8 with a V10 engine.

You’ll spend upwards of £190,000 for the indemand Performante, which seems steep when a brand new Huracán Evo RWD is £165,000 or so. However, bear in mind that there’s no such thing as a ‘standard’ Lamborghini, and optional extras often inflate showroom prices by 20 per cent or more. Another good reason to buy used and let someone else take the initial depreciation hit… At the top end of the market, the going rate for an STO with a few options is £350,000. That allows you to skip the queue, but bear in mind this isn’t a limited-production model, so values will inevitably take a hit in the short to medium-term. It’s one to buy and keep forever.


TYPICAL PRICES

  • Huracán LP610-4, 2015, 33k miles, grey, £127,000
  • Huracán LP580-2, 2017, 8k miles, black, £147,000
  • Huracán LP610-4 Spyder, 2016, 14k miles, blue, £163,000
  • Huracán Performante LP640-4, 2017, 14k miles, white, £190,000
  • Huracán Evo LP640-4, 2019, 9k miles, blue, £200,000

Many thanks to Karl Verdi at Verdi Supercars and Korel Hussein at H.R. Owen for their help with this buying guide, as well as Juliet Jarvis at Lamborghini UK. Contact: Verdi Supercars – 8-10 Hayes Metro Centre, Springfield Road, Hayes, Middlesex UB4 0LE. Tel: 020 8756 0066. Web: www.verdisupercars.co.uk HR Owen Lamborghini – Locations in London, Manchester, Hatfield and Pangbourne – go to www.hrowen.co.uk/lamborghini

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONSLP610-4 PERFORMANTE EVO RWD STO

  • ENGINE: 5204cc V10 5204cc V10 5204cc V10 5204cc V10
  • POWER: 610hp at 8250rpm 640hp at 8000rpm 610hp at 8000rpm 640hp at 8000rpm
  • TORQUE: 413lb ft at 6500rpm 443lb ft at 6500rpm 413lb ft at 6500rpm 417lb ft at 6500rpm
  • TRANSMISSION: 7-speed dual-clutch 7-speed dual-clutch 7-speed dual-clutch 7-speed dual-clutch
  • WEIGHT: 1422kg 1382kg 1389kg 1339kg
  • 0-62MPH: 3.2 secs 2.9 secs 3.3 secs 3.0 secs
  • MAX SPEED: 202mph 202mph 202mph 202mph

Spyder doesn’t lose much sharpness compared to coupe. Two-wheel drive models are sought after

The Huracán has aged like a fine chianti… It has been steadily honed and enhanced ”

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Chris Randall Chris Randall 1 month ago #

HURACÁN VERSUS R8

I’m glad you mentioned the Audi R8 in your Lamborghini Huracán Buyers’ Guide. Considering that the Lamborghini is essentially an R8 under the skin, I wonder what could possibly justify a price difference of 2.5 times on the used car market, as your pricing guide suggests? I even prefer the way the R8 looks compared to the Lamborghini, which is painful to admit considering I’m an Italian car fan through and through. Should I now hide my shame and type ‘Audi’ into the search field on Autotrader? Maybe that’s a step too far…

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